Author Archives: Juan-Jacques Aupiais

Juan-Jacques Aupiais

About Juan-Jacques Aupiais

Juan-Jacques Aupiais is a junior in the Department of German. Contact him, if you desire, at jaupiais@princeton.edu.

It’s Because They’re Dirty, You See

Neill Blokamp’s “Elysium” is a film about a small minority holding the power and wealth, forcing the masses to live in squalor based on illusions of superiority. But I think that this analysis can be taken much further. Continue reading

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Serious Memories

There is a persistent problematization and bringing together of objects, memories, and stories in O Where Are You Going? that drives forward the plot but also involves the audience in making sense of the identities of the characters, and which makes this piece of theater so serious and so human. Continue reading

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The Death of Nihilism

The success of Theater Intime’s production of “No Exit” and “The Chairs” lies in its refutation of the idea that the existentialists and absurdists were nothing more than nihilists. Continue reading

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A Bit of Racy Fun

Princeton audiences keen on musical theatre are in for a treat this weekend with the Black Art Company’s production of Aida, the Tony Award-winning musical inspired by Giuseppe Verdi’s opera classic and transformed into a Broadway hit in 2000 by Tim Rice and Elton John. Continue reading

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The Nietzschean and the Chimp

The Master, much like There Will Be Blood, is less exciting as an exercise in history than as an exercise in anthropology – that is, it speaks more to the internal dynamics of social groups than to particular institutions or individuals. Continue reading

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